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  • 18.05.2019 | US mulls temporary reprieve of Huawei ban




    Restrictions on Huawei Technologies may temporarily be scaled back, the US Commerce Department noted on Friday after blacklisting the Chinese tech giant under President Donald Trump’s ‘national emergency’ declaration. The department might issue a temporary general license for 90 days to give companies using Huawei's equipment enough time to maintain their communications network while switching to alternatives, Reuters reported. The possible award of a general license however would not apply to new transactions, the Commerce Department noted. Washington added Huawei to its blacklist on Thursday after Trump ruled that the Chinese firm could “undermine US national security or foreign policy interests,” particularly in developing America’s 5G network. Huawei slammed Washington’s decision amid accusations of spying and trade tensions with Beijing, warning that the move will leave the US behind in deploying 5G telecommunications services which in the long run will only hurt Americans.   ...

    Restrictions on Huawei Technologies may temporarily be scaled back, the US Commerce Department noted on Friday after blacklisting the Chinese tech giant under President Donald Trump’s ‘national emergency’ declaration.

    The department might issue a temporary general license for 90 days to give companies using Huawei's equipment enough time to maintain their communications network while switching to alternatives, Reuters reported.

    The possible award of a general license however would not apply to new transactions, the Commerce Department noted.

    Washington added Huawei to its blacklist on Thursday after Trump ruled that the Chinese firm could “undermine US national security or foreign policy interests,” particularly in developing America’s 5G network.

    Huawei slammed Washington’s decision amid accusations of spying and trade tensions with Beijing, warning that the move will leave the US behind in deploying 5G telecommunications services which in the long run will only hurt Americans.

     


    18.05.2019 | Absence is coming: Game of Thrones finale could kill workplace productivity on Monday




    The final Game of Thrones episode premiering on May 19 is likely to cause major workplace conflicts, a new survey from the Workforce Institute at Kronos, conducted by the Harris Poll, has found. According to the study, the “Absence is Coming” episode could be as disastrous to America’s workplaces on Monday morning as it will likely be to some of the show’s characters. “Approximately 27.2 million employees who plan to watch the Game of Thrones finale live admit they will either miss work completely, arrive late, work remotely, be less productive than usual, or experience another impact on work obligations Monday because of the series finale of the most popular show in HBO history,” it said. Based on the survey’s predictions, approximately 10.7 million Americans are already planning to take the day off from work completely while 2.9 million are planning to show up late. Season 8 has already had a negative impact on workplace productivity, the study found. It estimated that 4.4 million employees have already “missed work specifically to stream reruns to refresh their memory on key plotlines or catch up on missed episodes.” When asked which Game of Thrones character they’d most like to have as a manager, one in four respondents (28 percent) named Jon Snow. Tyrion Lannister came in second (12 percent), followed by Mother of Dragons Daenerys Targaryen (nine percent). Even Cersei Lannister got two percent of the vote. “What do we say to the God of Absence? Not today – or at least organizations can if they embrace, not avoid, cultural phenomenon like the Game of Thrones series finale,” said Joyce Maroney, executive director at the Workforce Institute at Kronos. “Empower employees with flexible schedules and the ability to request time off or swap shifts from anywhere, at any time so they can enjoy moments that matter in their lives, and don’t be shy to use pop culture common ground to build camaraderie with employees and managers,” she added. According to Maroney, the survey also found that a third of employees (33 percent) use TV shows and events to build closer relationships with colleagues and supervisors. “Open the lines of communication with your employees, use the right tools to simplify scheduling, and have a playbook to incorporate these events, when appropriate, into your engagement strategy.” The survey was conducted online between May 7 and May 9, before ‘The Bells’ episode (the series’ most-watched so far, with 18.4 million viewers) aired. It analyzed results of 1,090 working adults who took part in the online poll alongside US Census Data and extrapolated its final tallies from there. The Game of Thrones’ finale is expected to rival some of the most-watched series finales of all time and create the “biggest storm of workplace disruption since the Super Bowl.”     ...

    The final Game of Thrones episode premiering on May 19 is likely to cause major workplace conflicts, a new survey from the Workforce Institute at Kronos, conducted by the Harris Poll, has found.

    According to the study, the “Absence is Coming” episode could be as disastrous to America’s workplaces on Monday morning as it will likely be to some of the show’s characters.

    “Approximately 27.2 million employees who plan to watch the Game of Thrones finale live admit they will either miss work completely, arrive late, work remotely, be less productive than usual, or experience another impact on work obligations Monday because of the series finale of the most popular show in HBO history,” it said.

    Based on the survey’s predictions, approximately 10.7 million Americans are already planning to take the day off from work completely while 2.9 million are planning to show up late. Season 8 has already had a negative impact on workplace productivity, the study found. It estimated that 4.4 million employees have already “missed work specifically to stream reruns to refresh their memory on key plotlines or catch up on missed episodes.”

    When asked which Game of Thrones character they’d most like to have as a manager, one in four respondents (28 percent) named Jon Snow. Tyrion Lannister came in second (12 percent), followed by Mother of Dragons Daenerys Targaryen (nine percent). Even Cersei Lannister got two percent of the vote.

    “What do we say to the God of Absence? Not today – or at least organizations can if they embrace, not avoid, cultural phenomenon like the Game of Thrones series finale,” said Joyce Maroney, executive director at the Workforce Institute at Kronos.

    “Empower employees with flexible schedules and the ability to request time off or swap shifts from anywhere, at any time so they can enjoy moments that matter in their lives, and don’t be shy to use pop culture common ground to build camaraderie with employees and managers,” she added.

    According to Maroney, the survey also found that a third of employees (33 percent) use TV shows and events to build closer relationships with colleagues and supervisors. “Open the lines of communication with your employees, use the right tools to simplify scheduling, and have a playbook to incorporate these events, when appropriate, into your engagement strategy.”

    The survey was conducted online between May 7 and May 9, before ‘The Bells’ episode (the series’ most-watched so far, with 18.4 million viewers) aired. It analyzed results of 1,090 working adults who took part in the online poll alongside US Census Data and extrapolated its final tallies from there.

    The Game of Thrones’ finale is expected to rival some of the most-watched series finales of all time and create the “biggest storm of workplace disruption since the Super Bowl.”

     

     


    18.05.2019 | Italys antitrust watchdog to probe Google over abuse of market dominance




    Italy has joined a growing list of nations to challenge US tech giant Google in connection with alleged abuse of the corporation’s market power in the smart device sector. The Italian Antitrust Authority said it launched an investigation into antitrust practices. According to a statement, the move comes after Google refused to integrate the application “Enel X Recharge,” designed by Italy’s energy multinational Enel, on its Android Auto app. According to the regulator, Android Auto allows users to use some apps and phone features while driving, while the exclusion of the Enel’s app reduces the usability of the app, including the booking of recharge stations. Enel’s app helps to inform users about the location of charging stations for electric cars and how to reach them. Google reportedly reinforces the business model of its Google Maps app, which also allows the Android users to get information about charging stations. The competition regulator said that its officials conducted inspections in some of the companies concerned. The investigation is expected to be completed by May 30 next year. Google’s Android operating system is one of the world’s most popular mobile software systems. Android is installed on more than 80 percent of devices globally. Google enjoys a dominant position in the market of smart device operating systems. In March, the European Commission fined the California-based company €1.5 billion ($1.7 billion) for abusing its market dominance, marking the third antitrust penalty against the Big Tech firm in less than three years. In 2018, the EU hit Google with the biggest antitrust fine of €4.3 billion, saying that its Android system tended to block rivals. A year earlier, the corporation was fined €2.4 billion over manipulated search results.     ...

    Italy has joined a growing list of nations to challenge US tech giant Google in connection with alleged abuse of the corporation’s market power in the smart device sector.

    The Italian Antitrust Authority said it launched an investigation into antitrust practices. According to a statement, the move comes after Google refused to integrate the application “Enel X Recharge,” designed by Italy’s energy multinational Enel, on its Android Auto app.

    According to the regulator, Android Auto allows users to use some apps and phone features while driving, while the exclusion of the Enel’s app reduces the usability of the app, including the booking of recharge stations.

    Enel’s app helps to inform users about the location of charging stations for electric cars and how to reach them. Google reportedly reinforces the business model of its Google Maps app, which also allows the Android users to get information about charging stations.

    The competition regulator said that its officials conducted inspections in some of the companies concerned. The investigation is expected to be completed by May 30 next year.

    Google’s Android operating system is one of the world’s most popular mobile software systems. Android is installed on more than 80 percent of devices globally. Google enjoys a dominant position in the market of smart device operating systems.

    In March, the European Commission fined the California-based company €1.5 billion ($1.7 billion) for abusing its market dominance, marking the third antitrust penalty against the Big Tech firm in less than three years. In 2018, the EU hit Google with the biggest antitrust fine of €4.3 billion, saying that its Android system tended to block rivals. A year earlier, the corporation was fined €2.4 billion over manipulated search results.

     

     


    18.05.2019 | One third of art market is fake: Art detective reveals how terrorists, mafia profit from it




    As the ‘Indiana Jones of Lost Art’, Arthur Brand often finds himself at the crossroads of the illicit art trade and a shadowy criminal underground. The art detective joined RT’s SophieCo to reveal the secrets of his trade. From the posh galleries of the European art scene to the farthest reaches of the Afghan Hindu Kush, Brand is on the hunt for stolen treasures. His work can sound much like a spy thriller, a world of clandestine meetings and forged documents. Working with criminals, of course, has its risks. “Sometimes you get threats,” he said, “I have to be cautious.” The mafia and other criminal groups aren’t the only players dealing in stolen artwork; terrorist militants have entered the black market as well – what the CIA calls the world’s fourth largest illegal enterprise. The unlikely archeologists use the proceeds from stolen relics to finance their terror attacks. “They call it blood antiques,” Brand said. “Groups like the Taliban, Al-Qaeda and ISIS, they conquer a certain area which is full of treasures,” forging paperwork and selling the artifacts in legal markets. “Museums have bought [them] in the past” he said. “You can find them at auction houses. You can find them at art deals.” Brand noted that in addition to the stolen masterpieces, fake ones are making the rounds as well. “It's absolutely more common than rare,” he said. “Thirty percent on the art market is fake. Either it's complete fake or they have messed with it.”     ...

    As the ‘Indiana Jones of Lost Art’, Arthur Brand often finds himself at the crossroads of the illicit art trade and a shadowy criminal underground. The art detective joined RT’s SophieCo to reveal the secrets of his trade.

    From the posh galleries of the European art scene to the farthest reaches of the Afghan Hindu Kush, Brand is on the hunt for stolen treasures. His work can sound much like a spy thriller, a world of clandestine meetings and forged documents.

    Working with criminals, of course, has its risks.

    “Sometimes you get threats,” he said, “I have to be cautious.”

    The mafia and other criminal groups aren’t the only players dealing in stolen artwork; terrorist militants have entered the black market as well – what the CIA calls the world’s fourth largest illegal enterprise. The unlikely archeologists use the proceeds from stolen relics to finance their terror attacks.

    “They call it blood antiques,” Brand said. “Groups like the Taliban, Al-Qaeda and ISIS, they conquer a certain area which is full of treasures,” forging paperwork and selling the artifacts in legal markets.

    “Museums have bought [them] in the past” he said. “You can find them at auction houses. You can find them at art deals.”

    Brand noted that in addition to the stolen masterpieces, fake ones are making the rounds as well.

    “It's absolutely more common than rare,” he said. “Thirty percent on the art market is fake. Either it's complete fake or they have messed with it.”

     

     



    15.05.2019 | Trump bad! Migrants good! Venice Biennale is liberal establishment smugness as art




    It pretends to shock and challenge, but the talking points of the art at the world’s biggest exhibition come straight from the New York Times op-ed page. And despite the counter-cultural non-conformism – everything is for sale. Let’s leave for the moment the “is-it-art?” and “my-four-year-old-could-do-it” discussions as they pertain to the 87 pavilions throughout Venice in which countries from Albania to Zimbabwe exhibit the best of contemporary art, alongside the 79 specially-invited individual artists. Take instead in good faith its guiding principles – that in place of craftsmanship almost all of the art at this exhibition sources its power from the social critique it conveys. So, what is the message? The signature piece of this year’s Biennale is the wreck of a fishing boat, in which 800 migrants died off the coast of Libya in 2015, erected opposite a cafe on the promenade. That’s it, nothing else done to the rusting carcass. As you sip your Aperol Spritz, you are presumably meant to say something “That’s terrible that all these people died” or “Poor African migrants” or “Isn’t that Matteo Salvini a bastard for not letting these people in, I would never vote for him.” So thought-provoking, a real conversation starter. And adds so much to the discussion on migration. Though perhaps not up to par to a 2015 piece by the same artist, Christoph Buechel, which was to turn an old Catholic church into a mosque, which was just so incredibly daring and clever. Or visit the Lithuanian pavilion, which won the top national prize. It features tourists on a fake beach singing joyous arias about their clothes, made in Chinese sweatshops, about airplanes, dispatching CO2 into the atmosphere, about how it’s getting hotter all the time. The message: our capitalist, consumerist world is so stupid and complacent – all obliviously singing happy songs as global warming roasts us. Get it? Here is the individual winner – black Los Angeles artist Arthur Jafa’s White Album, which is 40 minutes of mostly close-ups of white people being purposely or accidentally racist about black people, juxtaposed with scenes of racial violence. See: white people are racist, America is racist, you are probably a racist too. The overwhelmingly white audience sits there in penitent self-loathing, though safe in the knowledge that they are not like THOSE OTHER WHITE PEOPLE who’ve probably never even been to a decent art exhibition. A separate sub-genre is anti-Trump art. There is a portrait of disfigured smears under the recognizable hair (“Trump is ugly chaos”), there is a replica of an empty Lincoln Memorial chair with a whip attached (“America in a nutshell”), and someone actually exhibited printouts of Hillary Clinton’s emails (“He keeps asking for those emails, well here they are!”). The 2019 Biennale is subtitled 'May We Live in Interesting Times', an ironic Chinese curse wishing your enemy to suffer through a dark era. Because, obviously, times were never interesting under Obama. Now, you may agree or disagree with the messages expressed by this art, but it is hard to argue against the fact that we hear these exact same sentiments every day almost to the letter. And not in some upstart radical pamphlets, but in the Washington Post, on CNN, in the Guardian. At Harvard and at Google. From Clinton, Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel, and Jean-Claude Juncker. At concert to celebrate Lorenzo Quinn's Building Bridges sculpture, which shows friendship between cultures by building a literal bridge. © Getty Images/David M. Benett So, the social critique on which these artists stake their creative credentials seems to be – take the most hackneyed and glib message of the well-to-do centrist establishment and to visually amplify it with a thundering heavy-handedness, add a bit of pseudo-shock value and no original thought. Reap the easy applause from those who already agree with you. And this is where the craftsmanship argument comes back in. The endless Saint Sebastians and Madonnas of the Renaissance, or pastoral Italian landscapes, may not have had something new to say either, but they had inherent artistic value. At best they still connect with the viewer on an emotional level, at worst they are testaments to hard-earned skill or artefacts to the period they were made. What the value of all this Trump-is-bad art will be, not in 500 years but in 50, is an open question. Anyone up for recreating a topical hangar-sized installation about the Suez Crisis? Though frankly for much of the art, the legacy aspect is a moot question, as it is already worthless in 2019. Of course, the kicker for the Venice Biennale – and one everyone here must be aware of – is that for all the environmental concerns, both making and transporting these voluminous pieces, as well as attracting millions of visitors in their planes and luxury yachts to the sinking city is likely to have offset any habit-changing impact viewing them had on the audience. And for all the anti-capitalist posturing, this is essentially a commercial showcase, and much of the art is either sold directly (though discreetly, no dealer names on the plaques this year) or can lead to lucrative commissions. Yeah, the polar bears and the migrants died for this. A lot of art is commodification of suffering, but the piousness rankles. In fact, as you walk through Venice, and turn your gaze from the trendy artists, to the millionaire collectors, to the Instagraming tourists, the Biennale becomes a meta art installation all of its own: one about the self-congratulatory hypocrisy of modern right-thinking capitalism. ...

    It pretends to shock and challenge, but the talking points of the art at the world’s biggest exhibition come straight from the New York Times op-ed page. And despite the counter-cultural non-conformism – everything is for sale.

    Let’s leave for the moment the “is-it-art?” and “my-four-year-old-could-do-it” discussions as they pertain to the 87 pavilions throughout Venice in which countries from Albania to Zimbabwe exhibit the best of contemporary art, alongside the 79 specially-invited individual artists.

    Take instead in good faith its guiding principles – that in place of craftsmanship almost all of the art at this exhibition sources its power from the social critique it conveys.

    So, what is the message?
    The signature piece of this year’s Biennale is the wreck of a fishing boat, in which 800 migrants died off the coast of Libya in 2015, erected opposite a cafe on the promenade. That’s it, nothing else done to the rusting carcass. As you sip your Aperol Spritz, you are presumably meant to say something “That’s terrible that all these people died” or “Poor African migrants” or “Isn’t that Matteo Salvini a bastard for not letting these people in, I would never vote for him.” So thought-provoking, a real conversation starter. And adds so much to the discussion on migration. Though perhaps not up to par to a 2015 piece by the same artist, Christoph Buechel, which was to turn an old Catholic church into a mosque, which was just so incredibly daring and clever.
    Or visit the Lithuanian pavilion, which won the top national prize. It features tourists on a fake beach singing joyous arias about their clothes, made in Chinese sweatshops, about airplanes, dispatching CO2 into the atmosphere, about how it’s getting hotter all the time. The message: our capitalist, consumerist world is so stupid and complacent – all obliviously singing happy songs as global warming roasts us. Get it?
    Here is the individual winner – black Los Angeles artist Arthur Jafa’s White Album, which is 40 minutes of mostly close-ups of white people being purposely or accidentally racist about black people, juxtaposed with scenes of racial violence. See: white people are racist, America is racist, you are probably a racist too. The overwhelmingly white audience sits there in penitent self-loathing, though safe in the knowledge that they are not like THOSE OTHER WHITE PEOPLE who’ve probably never even been to a decent art exhibition.
    A separate sub-genre is anti-Trump art. There is a portrait of disfigured smears under the recognizable hair (“Trump is ugly chaos”), there is a replica of an empty Lincoln Memorial chair with a whip attached (“America in a nutshell”), and someone actually exhibited printouts of Hillary Clinton’s emails (“He keeps asking for those emails, well here they are!”). The 2019 Biennale is subtitled 'May We Live in Interesting Times', an ironic Chinese curse wishing your enemy to suffer through a dark era. Because, obviously, times were never interesting under Obama.
    Now, you may agree or disagree with the messages expressed by this art, but it is hard to argue against the fact that we hear these exact same sentiments every day almost to the letter. And not in some upstart radical pamphlets, but in the Washington Post, on CNN, in the Guardian. At Harvard and at Google. From Clinton, Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel, and Jean-Claude Juncker.
    At concert to celebrate Lorenzo Quinn's Building Bridges sculpture, which shows friendship between cultures by building a literal bridge. © Getty Images/David M. Benett

    So, the social critique on which these artists stake their creative credentials seems to be – take the most hackneyed and glib message of the well-to-do centrist establishment and to visually amplify it with a thundering heavy-handedness, add a bit of pseudo-shock value and no original thought. Reap the easy applause from those who already agree with you.

    And this is where the craftsmanship argument comes back in. The endless Saint Sebastians and Madonnas of the Renaissance, or pastoral Italian landscapes, may not have had something new to say either, but they had inherent artistic value. At best they still connect with the viewer on an emotional level, at worst they are testaments to hard-earned skill or artefacts to the period they were made.

    What the value of all this Trump-is-bad art will be, not in 500 years but in 50, is an open question. Anyone up for recreating a topical hangar-sized installation about the Suez Crisis? Though frankly for much of the art, the legacy aspect is a moot question, as it is already worthless in 2019.

    Of course, the kicker for the Venice Biennale – and one everyone here must be aware of – is that for all the environmental concerns, both making and transporting these voluminous pieces, as well as attracting millions of visitors in their planes and luxury yachts to the sinking city is likely to have offset any habit-changing impact viewing them had on the audience. And for all the anti-capitalist posturing, this is essentially a commercial showcase, and much of the art is either sold directly (though discreetly, no dealer names on the plaques this year) or can lead to lucrative commissions. Yeah, the polar bears and the migrants died for this. A lot of art is commodification of suffering, but the piousness rankles.

    In fact, as you walk through Venice, and turn your gaze from the trendy artists, to the millionaire collectors, to the Instagraming tourists, the Biennale becomes a meta art installation all of its own: one about the self-congratulatory hypocrisy of modern right-thinking capitalism.


    15.05.2019 | Russia boosting gold & dumping dollar from foreign currency reserves




    The Central Bank of Russia reports that foreign exchange reserves saw a significant boost of nearly $3.3 billion in April as the country pursues a policy of increasing its forex funds and diversifying them away from the US dollar. The latest growth of 0.7 percent brought Russian international reserve funds to nearly $492 billion against $487.8 billion seen at the end of March, the latest data published by the regulator shows. The state international reserves are highly liquid foreign assets comprising stocks of monetary gold, foreign currencies and Special Drawing Right (SDR) assets, which are at the disposal of the Central Bank of Russia and the government. According to Elvira Nabiullina, head of the central bank, Russia is diversifying its foreign exchange reserves more than other states because of the economic and political risks that the country is facing. The central bank has reportedly increased holdings of Chinese yuan and lowered the share of US dollars in its reserves over recent months. The country’s key monetary regulator stands ready to use FX swaps and repo operations if it sees a need to calm markets during times of stress, Nabiullina said on Tuesday, speaking at a conference in Zurich. In March, the Central Bank of Russia added nearly 18.7 tons of gold to the county’s vast stockpile of the precious metal. The step reportedly brought Russia’s estimated gold holdings to more than 2,170 tons (69,700,000 ounces), which accounts for nearly 18 percent of the country’s total foreign exchange reserves.         ...

    The Central Bank of Russia reports that foreign exchange reserves saw a significant boost of nearly $3.3 billion in April as the country pursues a policy of increasing its forex funds and diversifying them away from the US dollar.

    The latest growth of 0.7 percent brought Russian international reserve funds to nearly $492 billion against $487.8 billion seen at the end of March, the latest data published by the regulator shows.

    The state international reserves are highly liquid foreign assets comprising stocks of monetary gold, foreign currencies and Special Drawing Right (SDR) assets, which are at the disposal of the Central Bank of Russia and the government.

    According to Elvira Nabiullina, head of the central bank, Russia is diversifying its foreign exchange reserves more than other states because of the economic and political risks that the country is facing.

    The central bank has reportedly increased holdings of Chinese yuan and lowered the share of US dollars in its reserves over recent months. The country’s key monetary regulator stands ready to use FX swaps and repo operations if it sees a need to calm markets during times of stress, Nabiullina said on Tuesday, speaking at a conference in Zurich.

    In March, the Central Bank of Russia added nearly 18.7 tons of gold to the county’s vast stockpile of the precious metal. The step reportedly brought Russia’s estimated gold holdings to more than 2,170 tons (69,700,000 ounces), which accounts for nearly 18 percent of the country’s total foreign exchange reserves.

     

     

     

     


    15.05.2019 | XRP Price Fails to Hang on to $0.4 but Uptrend Isnt Broken




    It has been a very interesting day for all cryptocurrencies, tokens, and assets. Although the big gains are literally spread out across the board, the XRP price has noted some incredibly bullish momentum. It even surpassed $0.42 at one point, although the trend has calmed down a bit. The ongoing mirroring of Bitcoin’s price trend could negate the remaining gains rather quickly. Where is the XRP Price Headed? A very peculiar albeit somewhat predictable trend is forming across all markets. Bitcoin’s bull run is showing signs of slowing down, which will inevitably allow altcoins to reclaim some lost value in the process. As far as XRP is concerned, the market seemingly couldn’t care less about what is happening to Bitcoin. This popular asset has engaged all of the pumps in a rather convincing manner. To put this in perspective, the XRP price has risen by 19.2% to $0.391241. This is not the highest value XRP has reached today, albeit the top at $0.42 was not sustainable for more than a few hours on end. Traders will also be pleased to learn the XRP/BTC ratio has finally shown signs of improvement. An 18% increase pushes the ratio back to 4,950 Satoshi, albeit temporarily. It is always difficult to determine if there is any specific reason for this market push. One thing is certain: Coinbase users in New York can now buy, sell, and convert XRP through the trading platform. The same functionality is available across the mobile apps for iOS and Android as well. A positive development for New York-based traders, who are often left out in the cold. Others are simply cheering on from the sidelines.FreeZeeg is one of those individuals, as he expects XRP to become the winner of this ongoing bull run. There is certainly a chance the popular asset will continue to surprise a lot of people, albeit it is possible the whole industry-wide bull run will come to an end this week. Turkish traders are still active on Twitter, which is always good to see. The user below expects a massive run to 6,000 Satoshi in the coming days and weeks. That would certainly be impressive in its own regard, albeit one also has to admit it is incredibly unlikely. That would require another 20% increase in XRP/BTC, which would also send the XRP value itself up by another 20% if Bitcoin doesn’t drop further. All things considered, it is evident there is a lot of momentum happening right now. Some markets are heading in the right direction, whereas others need a much-required breather. The coming days will remain very entertaining for those who are in it to make a quick buck, albeit the risks may not outweigh potential rewards. Disclaimer: This is not trading or investment advice. The above article is for entertainment and education purposes only. Please do your own research before purchasing or investing into any cryptocurrency.     #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }...

    It has been a very interesting day for all cryptocurrencies, tokens, and assets. Although the big gains are literally spread out across the board, the XRP price has noted some incredibly bullish momentum. It even surpassed $0.42 at one point, although the trend has calmed down a bit. The ongoing mirroring of Bitcoin’s price trend could negate the remaining gains rather quickly.

    Where is the XRP Price Headed?

    A very peculiar albeit somewhat predictable trend is forming across all markets. Bitcoin’s bull run is showing signs of slowing down, which will inevitably allow altcoins to reclaim some lost value in the process. As far as XRP is concerned, the market seemingly couldn’t care less about what is happening to Bitcoin. This popular asset has engaged all of the pumps in a rather convincing manner.

    To put this in perspective, the XRP price has risen by 19.2% to $0.391241. This is not the highest value XRP has reached today, albeit the top at $0.42 was not sustainable for more than a few hours on end. Traders will also be pleased to learn the XRP/BTC ratio has finally shown signs of improvement. An 18% increase pushes the ratio back to 4,950 Satoshi, albeit temporarily.

    It is always difficult to determine if there is any specific reason for this market push. One thing is certain: Coinbase users in New York can now buy, sell, and convert XRP through the trading platform. The same functionality is available across the mobile apps for iOS and Android as well. A positive development for New York-based traders, who are often left out in the cold.

    Others are simply cheering on from the sidelines.FreeZeeg is one of those individuals, as he expects XRP to become the winner of this ongoing bull run. There is certainly a chance the popular asset will continue to surprise a lot of people, albeit it is possible the whole industry-wide bull run will come to an end this week.

    Turkish traders are still active on Twitter, which is always good to see. The user below expects a massive run to 6,000 Satoshi in the coming days and weeks. That would certainly be impressive in its own regard, albeit one also has to admit it is incredibly unlikely. That would require another 20% increase in XRP/BTC, which would also send the XRP value itself up by another 20% if Bitcoin doesn’t drop further.

    All things considered, it is evident there is a lot of momentum happening right now. Some markets are heading in the right direction, whereas others need a much-required breather. The coming days will remain very entertaining for those who are in it to make a quick buck, albeit the risks may not outweigh potential rewards.


    Disclaimer: This is not trading or investment advice. The above article is for entertainment and education purposes only. Please do your own research before purchasing or investing into any cryptocurrency.

     

     


    #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }


    15.05.2019 | Ethereum Price Analysis ETH Managed to Carry on Rising




    The ETH is rising for the second day in a row, trading around $208.62 on May 14, following the BTC and other cryptos. On D1, Buterin’s coin continues its uptrend, with the price having reached the current channel resistance. Once the latter gets broken out, the crypto will be able to reach the projection channel resistance at $257.60, or 23.60% Fibo; the rise may then continue even further. The support is meanwhile at $160. On H4, the ETH is testing the current channel resistance, and may pull back in the short term, once the local support is broken out and the price heads to 23.60% Fibo, or $199.52. The next targets are lying at 38.20%, or $189.93, and 50%, or $182.13. Ethereum is getting ready for a huge update that would raise the transaction speed and improve security. The new Sapphire network based on Casper PoS protocol for Ethereum 2.0 is now working in sandbox mode, and the users may already test a new mining scheme, ETH stacking. Unlike traditional mining, in this mode, one may store crypto coins on in-built wallets. The coins may be then transferred from the sandbox to the new network, and both penalties and rewards may be earned. The sandbox environment has no smart contract access yet, and the number of validators is limited, but these limits are to be lifted in the future. Ethereum 2.0 is going to become quicker, safer, and more cost-effective. The transaction speed is going to be 1,000 TPS, which is impressive. Any predictions contained herein are based on the authors’ particular opinion. This analysis shall not be treated as trading advice. RoboForex shall not be held liable for the results of the trades arising from relying upon trading recommendations and reviews contained herein.     ...

    The ETH is rising for the second day in a row, trading around $208.62 on May 14, following the BTC and other cryptos.

    On D1, Buterin’s coin continues its uptrend, with the price having reached the current channel resistance. Once the latter gets broken out, the crypto will be able to reach the projection channel resistance at $257.60, or 23.60% Fibo; the rise may then continue even further. The support is meanwhile at $160.

    On H4, the ETH is testing the current channel resistance, and may pull back in the short term, once the local support is broken out and the price heads to 23.60% Fibo, or $199.52. The next targets are lying at 38.20%, or $189.93, and 50%, or $182.13.

    Ethereum is getting ready for a huge update that would raise the transaction speed and improve security. The new Sapphire network based on Casper PoS protocol for Ethereum 2.0 is now working in sandbox mode, and the users may already test a new mining scheme, ETH stacking. Unlike traditional mining, in this mode, one may store crypto coins on in-built wallets. The coins may be then transferred from the sandbox to the new network, and both penalties and rewards may be earned.

    The sandbox environment has no smart contract access yet, and the number of validators is limited, but these limits are to be lifted in the future. Ethereum 2.0 is going to become quicker, safer, and more cost-effective. The transaction speed is going to be 1,000 TPS, which is impressive.

    Any predictions contained herein are based on the authors’ particular opinion. This analysis shall not be treated as trading advice. RoboForex shall not be held liable for the results of the trades arising from relying upon trading recommendations and reviews contained herein.

     

     


    15.05.2019 | RIP Cryptopia? Services Halted and Liquidators Appointed




    After confirming a hack back in January where the New Zealand based exchange lost over 9% of its holdings, Cryptopia has once again shut down its services after an 8 hour downtime this time for good. Visiting the official Cryptopia website, users are greeted with the following message: “David Ruscoe and Russell Moore from Grant Thornton New Zealand were yesterday appointed liquidators of Cryptopia Despite the efforts of management to reduce cost and return the business to profitability, it was decided the appointment of liquidators was, in the best interests of customers, staff and other stakeholders. The liquidators are focused on securing the assets for the benefit of all stakeholders. While this process and investigations take place, trading on the exchange is suspended. “Given the complexities involved we expect the investigation to take months rather than weeks.” The liquidators are also working with independent experts and the relevant authorities with regards to the company’s obligations. Grant Thornton will be contacting all customers and suppliers about its appointment in the next few days. Further enquiries, please email liquidation@cryptopia.co.nz” The above message was posted after an 8 hour downtime where users suspected that another hack occurred. Initially, Cryptopia reopened deposits and withdrawals back in April which allowed users to claim a certain percentage of their balances. Despite their attempt to resume business as usual and with the recent price rise of cryptocurrency, Cryptopia was unable to “to reduce cost and return the business to profitability.” As such, liquidators were appointed who will work with the exchange to secure assets and return as much of them as possible to affected users. As is usually the case, such an investigation will take many months to complete. Users should expect some sort of contact from Grant Thornton for further steps, most likely via the email used on the exchange.     ...

    After confirming a hack back in January where the New Zealand based exchange lost over 9% of its holdings, Cryptopia has once again shut down its services after an 8 hour downtime this time for good.

    Visiting the official Cryptopia website, users are greeted with the following message:

    “David Ruscoe and Russell Moore from Grant Thornton New Zealand were yesterday appointed liquidators of Cryptopia

    Despite the efforts of management to reduce cost and return the business to profitability, it was decided the appointment of liquidators was, in the best interests of customers, staff and other stakeholders.

    The liquidators are focused on securing the assets for the benefit of all stakeholders. While this process and investigations take place, trading on the exchange is suspended.

    “Given the complexities involved we expect the investigation to take months rather than weeks.”

    The liquidators are also working with independent experts and the relevant authorities with regards to the company’s obligations.

    Grant Thornton will be contacting all customers and suppliers about its appointment in the next few days.

    Further enquiries, please email liquidation@cryptopia.co.nz”

    The above message was posted after an 8 hour downtime where users suspected that another hack occurred. Initially, Cryptopia reopened deposits and withdrawals back in April which allowed users to claim a certain percentage of their balances.

    Despite their attempt to resume business as usual and with the recent price rise of cryptocurrency, Cryptopia was unable to “to reduce cost and return the business to profitability.” As such, liquidators were appointed who will work with the exchange to secure assets and return as much of them as possible to affected users.

    As is usually the case, such an investigation will take many months to complete. Users should expect some sort of contact from Grant Thornton for further steps, most likely via the email used on the exchange.

     

     


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