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  • 18.09.2019 | Huawei to invest $1.5bn in its developer program




    The Chinese tech company Huawei said on Wednesday that it will offer more than $1 billion in investment over the next five years to attract global developers. The offer is part of the company’s broader computing strategy, which includes investing in basic research around its products to support new technology such as artificial intelligence. The firm also said it will make its hardware and software more readily available to its customers and partners. Huawei announced its developer program four years ago. The company says it has supported more than 1.3 million developers since then, as well as 14,000 independent software vendors around the world. According to Huawei’s Deputy Chairman Ken Hu, the company wants to expand that program to another five million developers. It also wants to help partners “develop the next generation of intelligent applications and solutions.” Ken Hu said: “The future of computing is a massive market worth more than $2 trillion,” adding: “We’ll keep investing.” Huawei is currently caught in the crossfire of the US-China trade war. In May, the US placed Huawei on its so-called “Entity List,” effectively barring American companies from doing business with the Chinese tech giant. Washington accused the Huawei of being a threat to its national security and foreign policy interests. Despite the challenges, the Shenzhen-based company reported that its global share of telecoms equipment expanded to 28.1 percent in the first half of this year. It also remains ahead of global rivals in the 5G market, having announced 50 commercial 5G mobile network deals.   © AFP / Fred Dufour   https://quantsalus.com/about/...

    The Chinese tech company Huawei said on Wednesday that it will offer more than $1 billion in investment over the next five years to attract global developers.

    The offer is part of the company’s broader computing strategy, which includes investing in basic research around its products to support new technology such as artificial intelligence. The firm also said it will make its hardware and software more readily available to its customers and partners.

    Huawei announced its developer program four years ago. The company says it has supported more than 1.3 million developers since then, as well as 14,000 independent software vendors around the world.

    According to Huawei’s Deputy Chairman Ken Hu, the company wants to expand that program to another five million developers. It also wants to help partners “develop the next generation of intelligent applications and solutions.”

    Ken Hu said: “The future of computing is a massive market worth more than $2 trillion,” adding: “We’ll keep investing.”

    Huawei is currently caught in the crossfire of the US-China trade war. In May, the US placed Huawei on its so-called “Entity List,” effectively barring American companies from doing business with the Chinese tech giant. Washington accused the Huawei of being a threat to its national security and foreign policy interests.

    Despite the challenges, the Shenzhen-based company reported that its global share of telecoms equipment expanded to 28.1 percent in the first half of this year. It also remains ahead of global rivals in the 5G market, having announced 50 commercial 5G mobile network deals.

     

    © AFP / Fred Dufour

     

    https://quantsalus.com/about/


    14.09.2019 | Oil prices may slump heavily in 2020




    OPEC and its partners will not deepen their oil production cut yet but will discuss the topic again in December. This is what Saudi Arabia’s newly appointed Energy Minister Abdulaziz bin Salman told media after this week’s meeting of the Joint Ministerial Monitoring Committee. A discussion, however, may not be enough. OPEC may be forced to decide to cut deeper to prevent a major slump in prices. When OPEC agreed to cut 1.2 million bpd from the global market in December last year, benchmark prices reacted without much enthusiasm. In hindsight, this was a harbinger of tough times. Although prices rallied in the beginning of the second quarter of the year with Brent topping $70 a barrel, the rally was brief and correction followed soon enough. OPEC has been overcomplying with its production quotas. US sanctions against Venezuela and, to a lesser extent Iran, have helped this. And yet, prices have failed to rise again and stay higher. Brent has been hovering around $60 (€54) a barrel and WTI has been rangebound between $50 (€45) and $58 (€53). And now, prices are due to fall even further if demand forecasts from some of the world’s top energy agencies are correct. Bloomberg’s Julian Lee warned this week even tougher times were ahead for the oil-producing cartel and its partners next year as oil demand slowed down, according to the Energy Information Administration and OPEC itself. Indeed, in its latest Short-Term Energy Outlook, the EIA forecast global demand for liquid fuels would rise by 900,000 bpd on average for full-2019. That’s down from an earlier forecast of a demand growth rate of 1.3 million bpd. The international Energy Agency, for its part, forecast average demand growth this year would be 1.1 million bpd, unchanged from its earlier monthly estimate, and in 2020, it would accelerate to 1.3 million bpd. OPEC, interestingly, is the most pessimistic about demand. For this year, the group expects this at 1.02 million bpd, with a slight improvement to 1.08 million bpd next year. Slow demand growth is bad enough when you sacrifice market share growth for higher prices. Yet coupled with rising production from places you cannot control, the news becomes really bad. Besides the obvious wrench in OPEC’s works, US shale, production growth is imminent in Norway and Brazil as well. In the US, OPEC expects production to grow by 1.8 million bpd this year, which is substantially higher than the EIA’s forecast for domestic production growth, at 1.2 million bpd. The IEA, for its part, sees the US and Norway boosting production by a combined 1 million bpd in the second half of this year, with Brazil adding another 130,000 bpd. To add insult to injury, more of the additional U.S. oil being pumped in the shale patch is going to reach international markets as some 2 million bpd of new pipeline capacity enters into operation. Against this backdrop, OPEC’s limited options become clear. The cartel has two choices, and nobody is talking about the second one: a repeat of the pump-them-to-death approach that brought on the 2014 price collapse. The reason nobody is talking about it is that OPEC members lack sufficient financial buffers to withstand another price collapse unscathed. This leaves them with one choice: cut production more. Yet there is a problem with this, too. Russia has repeatedly signaled it is not too fond of more cuts. Moscow has been consistent in its general support for supply controls but reluctant to comply fully with these controls not least because it can do just fine with lower oil. The Russian central bank recently said it had stipulated a price of $25 per barrel of crude in a risk scenario for next year. That’s some pretty nutritious food for thought for Russia’s partners in the cuts.   File Photo © Reuters / Vasily Fedosenko   https://quantsalus.com/rules/...

    OPEC and its partners will not deepen their oil production cut yet but will discuss the topic again in December.

    This is what Saudi Arabia’s newly appointed Energy Minister Abdulaziz bin Salman told media after this week’s meeting of the Joint Ministerial Monitoring Committee. A discussion, however, may not be enough. OPEC may be forced to decide to cut deeper to prevent a major slump in prices.

    When OPEC agreed to cut 1.2 million bpd from the global market in December last year, benchmark prices reacted without much enthusiasm. In hindsight, this was a harbinger of tough times. Although prices rallied in the beginning of the second quarter of the year with Brent topping $70 a barrel, the rally was brief and correction followed soon enough.

    OPEC has been overcomplying with its production quotas. US sanctions against Venezuela and, to a lesser extent Iran, have helped this. And yet, prices have failed to rise again and stay higher. Brent has been hovering around $60 (€54) a barrel and WTI has been rangebound between $50 (€45) and $58 (€53). And now, prices are due to fall even further if demand forecasts from some of the world’s top energy agencies are correct.

    Bloomberg’s Julian Lee warned this week even tougher times were ahead for the oil-producing cartel and its partners next year as oil demand slowed down, according to the Energy Information Administration and OPEC itself.

    Indeed, in its latest Short-Term Energy Outlook, the EIA forecast global demand for liquid fuels would rise by 900,000 bpd on average for full-2019. That’s down from an earlier forecast of a demand growth rate of 1.3 million bpd.

    The international Energy Agency, for its part, forecast average demand growth this year would be 1.1 million bpd, unchanged from its earlier monthly estimate, and in 2020, it would accelerate to 1.3 million bpd.

    OPEC, interestingly, is the most pessimistic about demand. For this year, the group expects this at 1.02 million bpd, with a slight improvement to 1.08 million bpd next year.

    Slow demand growth is bad enough when you sacrifice market share growth for higher prices. Yet coupled with rising production from places you cannot control, the news becomes really bad.

    Besides the obvious wrench in OPEC’s works, US shale, production growth is imminent in Norway and Brazil as well. In the US, OPEC expects production to grow by 1.8 million bpd this year, which is substantially higher than the EIA’s forecast for domestic production growth, at 1.2 million bpd. The IEA, for its part, sees the US and Norway boosting production by a combined 1 million bpd in the second half of this year, with Brazil adding another 130,000 bpd.

    To add insult to injury, more of the additional U.S. oil being pumped in the shale patch is going to reach international markets as some 2 million bpd of new pipeline capacity enters into operation.

    Against this backdrop, OPEC’s limited options become clear. The cartel has two choices, and nobody is talking about the second one: a repeat of the pump-them-to-death approach that brought on the 2014 price collapse. The reason nobody is talking about it is that OPEC members lack sufficient financial buffers to withstand another price collapse unscathed. This leaves them with one choice: cut production more.

    Yet there is a problem with this, too. Russia has repeatedly signaled it is not too fond of more cuts. Moscow has been consistent in its general support for supply controls but reluctant to comply fully with these controls not least because it can do just fine with lower oil. The Russian central bank recently said it had stipulated a price of $25 per barrel of crude in a risk scenario for next year. That’s some pretty nutritious food for thought for Russia’s partners in the cuts.

     

    File Photo © Reuters / Vasily Fedosenko

     

    https://quantsalus.com/rules/


    12.09.2019 | France vows to block development of Facebook’s Libra cryptocurrency on European soil




    The French Finance Ministry has deemed Facebook’s Libra digital currency too risky to be authorized for development in Europe. “All these concerns about Libra are serious. I therefore want to say with plenty of clarity: In these conditions we cannot authorize the development of Libra on European soil,” Bruno Le Maire said while speaking at an OECD conference in Paris on Thursday. He cited systemic risks which the new digital coin may pose for the European market. These include financial risks, risks for the sovereignty of other nations’ currencies, and the potential for abuse of market dominance. Le Maire has already voiced his negative sentiment regarding the new cryptocurrency ever since Facebook unveiled the project in June. Among other things, he named issues with money laundering and terrorism financing, which could potentially arise once the coin is launched into circulation. The minister also said he had spoken with European Central Bank President Mario Draghi and Christine Lagarde, the ECB’s next chief, about creating a “public digital currency” apparently to counterpose Libra and the likes of it. Unlike central bank-backed currencies, Libra is to be regulated by an independent non-profit organization based in Switzerland dubbed the Libra Association. As it revealed on Wednesday, the Libra Association will apply for a payments license in Switzerland in a step confirming the country has been chosen to host Libra’s main supervisory authority. Facebook, along with 27 other companies like PayPal, Visa and Mastercard, is a founding member of the Libra Association. According to the founders, the main goal of the Libra project is to enable fast and low-cost payments and money transfers for people around the world. Facebook also previously noted the Libra is to be backed up by traditional currencies held in bank accounts, which is expected to enhance confidence in the new digital coin. Facebook’s intention to launch its own cryptocurrency has been met with concern and skepticism in many countries, as well as in crypto circles. Prior to France, authorities in the UK, the US, and Russia had also expressed concerns that Libra could create risks for the global financial system due to uncontrolled capital flows. However, the new ñryptocurrency is expected to launch on a global scale in the first quarter of 2020, if approved by regulators.     https://quantsalus.com/contacts/...

    The French Finance Ministry has deemed Facebook’s Libra digital currency too risky to be authorized for development in Europe.

    All these concerns about Libra are serious. I therefore want to say with plenty of clarity: In these conditions we cannot authorize the development of Libra on European soil,” Bruno Le Maire said while speaking at an OECD conference in Paris on Thursday. He cited systemic risks which the new digital coin may pose for the European market. These include financial risks, risks for the sovereignty of other nations’ currencies, and the potential for abuse of market dominance.

    Le Maire has already voiced his negative sentiment regarding the new cryptocurrency ever since Facebook unveiled the project in June. Among other things, he named issues with money laundering and terrorism financing, which could potentially arise once the coin is launched into circulation. The minister also said he had spoken with European Central Bank President Mario Draghi and Christine Lagarde, the ECB’s next chief, about creating a “public digital currency” apparently to counterpose Libra and the likes of it.

    Unlike central bank-backed currencies, Libra is to be regulated by an independent non-profit organization based in Switzerland dubbed the Libra Association. As it revealed on Wednesday, the Libra Association will apply for a payments license in Switzerland in a step confirming the country has been chosen to host Libra’s main supervisory authority.

    Facebook, along with 27 other companies like PayPal, Visa and Mastercard, is a founding member of the Libra Association. According to the founders, the main goal of the Libra project is to enable fast and low-cost payments and money transfers for people around the world. Facebook also previously noted the Libra is to be backed up by traditional currencies held in bank accounts, which is expected to enhance confidence in the new digital coin.

    Facebook’s intention to launch its own cryptocurrency has been met with concern and skepticism in many countries, as well as in crypto circles. Prior to France, authorities in the UK, the US, and Russia had also expressed concerns that Libra could create risks for the global financial system due to uncontrolled capital flows. However, the new ñryptocurrency is expected to launch on a global scale in the first quarter of 2020, if approved by regulators.

     

     

    https://quantsalus.com/contacts/


    11.09.2019 | Gold Prices Hover Around $1,500 Ahead of ECB Meeting




    Investing.com -- Gold prices hovered around $1,500 a troy ounce in early trading in New York on Wednesday, as disappointing news on the trade front and a recovery in global bond yields kept buyers sidelined. By 10:25 AM ET, gold futures for delivery on the Comex exchange were at $1,500.85 a troy ounce, up 0.1% on the day, while spot gold prices were up 0.6% at 1,494.24. Silver futures were flat at $18.18 an ounce, while platinum futures were the best performing haven metal, gaining 1.0% to $946.30 an ounce. In the absence of dramatic macro news, buyers were content to sit on their hands ahead of the European Central Bank’s policy meeting on Thursday. The ECB is widely expected to rejoin the global trend of monetary policy easing, although traders have pared their bets in recent days after several top ECB officials voiced concern about resuming large-scale bond purchases, while others have fretted that an aggressive move now would tie the hands of incoming President Christine Lagarde. Lagarde is due to succeed Mario Draghi as president in November. Against that backdrop, German 10-year government yields have rebounded to -0.55% from a record low of -0.74% last month, while the U.S. 10-year Treasury note hit a four-week high of 1.75% earlier Wednesday. U.K. gilt yields have also risen as the risk of a disorderly Brexit at the end of October has receded, while the confirmation of a new Italian government has also pre-empted another big political risk that had weighed on investors’ minds during the summer. All those developments tend to hurt gold, which offers no nominal return. The ECB’s meeting will be a warm-up to the Federal Reserve’s own policy meeting next week, where traders expect another 25 basis point cut to the target range for Fed funds. Fresh pressure from President Donald Trump, who tweeted earlier Wednesday that “boneheads” at the Fed should cut to “ZERO, or below”, had little impact on prices. Last week, it had been the turn of both China and Russia to ease monetary policy, the latter cutting its key rate to a five-year low of 7.00%, and the former cutting reserve requirements for banks. Holger Schmieding, chief economist at Berenberg Bank in Berlin, said in a recent note he expects the ECB to cut to its deposit rate by 20 basis points to -0.6%, to resume bond purchases at a level of 30 billion euros ($34 billion) a month for a year and to rule out any rise in interest rates until at least the second half of next year. He also expects measure to alleviate the pain of negative interest rates for the banking sector, which is struggling to earn profits and strengthen its collective balance sheet in the negative interest rate environment.   © Reuters.   https://quantsalus.com/faq/...

    Investing.com -- Gold prices hovered around $1,500 a troy ounce in early trading in New York on Wednesday, as disappointing news on the trade front and a recovery in global bond yields kept buyers sidelined.

    By 10:25 AM ET, gold futures for delivery on the Comex exchange were at $1,500.85 a troy ounce, up 0.1% on the day, while spot gold prices were up 0.6% at 1,494.24.

    Silver futures were flat at $18.18 an ounce, while platinum futures were the best performing haven metal, gaining 1.0% to $946.30 an ounce.

    In the absence of dramatic macro news, buyers were content to sit on their hands ahead of the European Central Bank’s policy meeting on Thursday.

    The ECB is widely expected to rejoin the global trend of monetary policy easing, although traders have pared their bets in recent days after several top ECB officials voiced concern about resuming large-scale bond purchases, while others have fretted that an aggressive move now would tie the hands of incoming President Christine Lagarde.

    Lagarde is due to succeed Mario Draghi as president in November.

    Against that backdrop, German 10-year government yields have rebounded to -0.55% from a record low of -0.74% last month, while the U.S. 10-year Treasury note hit a four-week high of 1.75% earlier Wednesday. U.K. gilt yields have also risen as the risk of a disorderly Brexit at the end of October has receded, while the confirmation of a new Italian government has also pre-empted another big political risk that had weighed on investors’ minds during the summer.

    All those developments tend to hurt gold, which offers no nominal return.

    The ECB’s meeting will be a warm-up to the Federal Reserve’s own policy meeting next week, where traders expect another 25 basis point cut to the target range for Fed funds. Fresh pressure from President Donald Trump, who tweeted earlier Wednesday that “boneheads” at the Fed should cut to “ZERO, or below”, had little impact on prices.

    Last week, it had been the turn of both China and Russia to ease monetary policy, the latter cutting its key rate to a five-year low of 7.00%, and the former cutting reserve requirements for banks.

    Holger Schmieding, chief economist at Berenberg Bank in Berlin, said in a recent note he expects the ECB to cut to its deposit rate by 20 basis points to -0.6%, to resume bond purchases at a level of 30 billion euros ($34 billion) a month for a year and to rule out any rise in interest rates until at least the second half of next year. He also expects measure to alleviate the pain of negative interest rates for the banking sector, which is struggling to earn profits and strengthen its collective balance sheet in the negative interest rate environment.

     

    © Reuters.

     

    https://quantsalus.com/faq/


    10.09.2019 | Tech Leads Stocks Lower; Yields Extend Push Higher




    (Bloomberg) -- Technology, health care and consumer shares led U.S. equities lower. Yields on most Treasury notes rose. The three main U.S. indexes opened with modest declines. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index dropped a second day, led by food and beverage and health-care shares. The pound fluctuated as embattled British Prime Minister Boris Johnson insisted he won’t ask for another Brexit delay, while U.K. wage and unemployment data beat estimates. Most euro-zone sovereign bonds nudged lower as European Central Bank officials prepare to meet. Treasuries added to declines from Monday. The recent pullback in the bond rally “is a correction to an outsized move in yields during August, not a turn in the trend,” Kit Juckes, chief global FX strategist at Societe Generale (PA:SOGN) SA, wrote in his daily note. “Last Friday’s U.S. labor market data show, clearly enough for me, that the U.S. economy is slowing slowly but steadily as the global trade slowdown infects it.” Investors are awaiting the ECB’s policy decisions on Thursday and those next week by the Federal Reserve and Bank of England as they assess how much monetary easing may be looming. On the foreign-trade front, China removed one more hurdle for foreign investment into its capital markets on Tuesday. Elsewhere, oil extended gains to the highest level in almost six weeks as Saudi Arabia’s new energy minister signaled his commitment to production cuts ahead of an OPEC+ meeting later this week. Gold headed for its fourth day of declines, sinking close to $1,490 an ounce.   © Reuters. Tech Leads Stocks Lower; Yields Extend Push Higher: Markets Wrap   https://quantsalus.com/contacts/...

    (Bloomberg) -- Technology, health care and consumer shares led U.S. equities lower. Yields on most Treasury notes rose.

    The three main U.S. indexes opened with modest declines. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index dropped a second day, led by food and beverage and health-care shares. The pound fluctuated as embattled British Prime Minister Boris Johnson insisted he won’t ask for another Brexit delay, while U.K. wage and unemployment data beat estimates. Most euro-zone sovereign bonds nudged lower as European Central Bank officials prepare to meet. Treasuries added to declines from Monday.

    The recent pullback in the bond rally “is a correction to an outsized move in yields during August, not a turn in the trend,” Kit Juckes, chief global FX strategist at Societe Generale (PA:SOGN) SA, wrote in his daily note. “Last Friday’s U.S. labor market data show, clearly enough for me, that the U.S. economy is slowing slowly but steadily as the global trade slowdown infects it.”

    Investors are awaiting the ECB’s policy decisions on Thursday and those next week by the Federal Reserve and Bank of England as they assess how much monetary easing may be looming. On the foreign-trade front, China removed one more hurdle for foreign investment into its capital markets on Tuesday.

    Elsewhere, oil extended gains to the highest level in almost six weeks as Saudi Arabia’s new energy minister signaled his commitment to production cuts ahead of an OPEC+ meeting later this week. Gold headed for its fourth day of declines, sinking close to $1,490 an ounce.

     

    © Reuters. Tech Leads Stocks Lower; Yields Extend Push Higher: Markets Wrap

     

    https://quantsalus.com/contacts/


    09.09.2019 | Instagram reported down worldwide




    nstagram users around the world have reported that the photo-sharing platform is down on both coasts of the US, in Europe, and beyond. Frustrated users took to Twitter to vent. The outage was spotted on Monday at around 5pm GMT (12pm Eastern Time), according to Downdetector.com, a website where users can report such problems. Issues ranged from certain features of the app, such as the text editing function, not working, to the app failing to open. Most of the reports came from New York, California, and the UK, with users as far afield as Brazil and Malaysia also finding problems. Bereft of their beloved social media platform, users took to Twitter to express their frustration, using memes, gifs, and snarky comments aimed at the Instagram team. Instagram is used by over one billion people around the world every month. However, outages are frequent, with the platform going dark three times in one week back in July. Staff apologized for the patchy performance at the time, and have yet to comment on the latest outage.   © Reuters / Lucas Jackson   https://quantsalus.com/faq/...

    nstagram users around the world have reported that the photo-sharing platform is down on both coasts of the US, in Europe, and beyond. Frustrated users took to Twitter to vent.

    The outage was spotted on Monday at around 5pm GMT (12pm Eastern Time), according to Downdetector.com, a website where users can report such problems.

    Issues ranged from certain features of the app, such as the text editing function, not working, to the app failing to open.

    Most of the reports came from New York, California, and the UK, with users as far afield as Brazil and Malaysia also finding problems.

    Bereft of their beloved social media platform, users took to Twitter to express their frustration, using memes, gifs, and snarky comments aimed at the Instagram team.

    Instagram is used by over one billion people around the world every month. However, outages are frequent, with the platform going dark three times in one week back in July. Staff apologized for the patchy performance at the time, and have yet to comment on the latest outage.

     

    © Reuters / Lucas Jackson

     

    https://quantsalus.com/faq/


    25.08.2019 | Apple and Samsung sued over ‘cancer risk’ from cell phone radiation




    Apple and Samsung have been hit with a class-action lawsuit over claims that their phones expose users to radio frequency emissions up to 500 percent beyond federal limits. Meanwhile the health debate around smartphones heats up. Filed following an investigation by the Chicago Tribune, the lawsuit alleges that the Radio Frequency (RF) emissions of a number of Apple and Samsung phones – among them the iPhone 8, iPhone X, and Galaxy S8 – “far exceed federal guidelines.” The risks of such radiation levels, it continues, include “increased cancer risk, cellular stress...genetic damages, learning and memory deficits, neurological disorders,” and a laundry list of other medical problems. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) tests phones by their ‘Specific Absorption Rate,’ measured in watts of energy absorbed per kilogram of body tissue. No phone sold in America can exceed 1.6 w/kg, while European regulators allow a more generous 2w/kg. However, health activists consider these levels outdated. Indeed, the FCC’s guidelines were put together in 1997, and were largely based on tests carried out by the US military on the head of a 220lb (100kg) soldier. Children can absorb more than 150 percent more phone radiation than adults, and up to ten times more radiation through their skulls. With kids as likely to use modern smartphones as top-tier military personnel, some researchers say that the FCC’s SAR guidelines are inadequate. No major public health organization has thus far been able to link cell phone use with cancer or other serious ailments. However, a number of studies have found that even at levels far below those set by the FCC, significant health effects are possible. Radiation 2,000 times lower than the 1.6 limit was found to weaken the DNA of lab rats and decrease their sperm count. A dose four times lower was found to statistically increase the likelihood of malignant tumors, while exposure to just under half the limit alters the sleep patterns of users. None of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit claim to have actually suffered any illness or health problems. Instead they are suing Apple and Samsung – two of the world’s three largest smartphone manufacturers – for misleading them into buying potentially dangerous devices. A number of the alarm-raising studies mentioned above were carried out in the 1990s and early 2000s, but the more powerful antennae and different transmitting standards of modern devices mean the true effects could be more drastic.   The upcoming rollout of 5G cell infrastructure has also rung alarm bells. 5G cell towers use shorter radio waves than their current-generation counterparts, meaning as cities in America fast-track their rollout, more will have to be erected to ensure coverage. These shorter waves, however, travel at a much higher frequency meaning users are bombarded with more radiation. The FCC maintains 5G is safe, but defers to the Food and Drug Administration’s assessment that “the weight of scientific evidence has not linked cell phones with any health problems” to back this up. Dr. Martin Paul, Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry at Washington State University, told RT that 5G poses a “great threat” to public health. Pointing to reproductive damage, cardiac effects, and oxidative stress, which can accelerate “every chronic disease we suffer from,” Paul slammed the US government for passing laws to speed up the rollout of 5G technology, but refusing to fund research into the consequences. With 5G promising a new chapter in a debate that has raged for three decades, lawsuits like the one filed against Apple and Samsung will likely become more and more commonplace.   © Pixnio   https://quantsalus.com/faq/...

    Apple and Samsung have been hit with a class-action lawsuit over claims that their phones expose users to radio frequency emissions up to 500 percent beyond federal limits. Meanwhile the health debate around smartphones heats up.

    Filed following an investigation by the Chicago Tribune, the lawsuit alleges that the Radio Frequency (RF) emissions of a number of Apple and Samsung phones – among them the iPhone 8, iPhone X, and Galaxy S8 – “far exceed federal guidelines.” The risks of such radiation levels, it continues, include “increased cancer risk, cellular stress...genetic damages, learning and memory deficits, neurological disorders,” and a laundry list of other medical problems.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) tests phones by their ‘Specific Absorption Rate,’ measured in watts of energy absorbed per kilogram of body tissue. No phone sold in America can exceed 1.6 w/kg, while European regulators allow a more generous 2w/kg. However, health activists consider these levels outdated. Indeed, the FCC’s guidelines were put together in 1997, and were largely based on tests carried out by the US military on the head of a 220lb (100kg) soldier.

    Children can absorb more than 150 percent more phone radiation than adults, and up to ten times more radiation through their skulls. With kids as likely to use modern smartphones as top-tier military personnel, some researchers say that the FCC’s SAR guidelines are inadequate.

    No major public health organization has thus far been able to link cell phone use with cancer or other serious ailments. However, a number of studies have found that even at levels far below those set by the FCC, significant health effects are possible. Radiation 2,000 times lower than the 1.6 limit was found to weaken the DNA of lab rats and decrease their sperm count. A dose four times lower was found to statistically increase the likelihood of malignant tumors, while exposure to just under half the limit alters the sleep patterns of users.

    None of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit claim to have actually suffered any illness or health problems. Instead they are suing Apple and Samsung – two of the world’s three largest smartphone manufacturers – for misleading them into buying potentially dangerous devices.

    A number of the alarm-raising studies mentioned above were carried out in the 1990s and early 2000s, but the more powerful antennae and different transmitting standards of modern devices mean the true effects could be more drastic. 

     The upcoming rollout of 5G cell infrastructure has also rung alarm bells. 5G cell towers use shorter radio waves than their current-generation counterparts, meaning as cities in America fast-track their rollout, more will have to be erected to ensure coverage. These shorter waves, however, travel at a much higher frequency meaning users are bombarded with more radiation.

    The FCC maintains 5G is safe, but defers to the Food and Drug Administration’s assessment that “the weight of scientific evidence has not linked cell phones with any health problems” to back this up.

    Dr. Martin Paul, Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry at Washington State University, told RT that 5G poses a “great threat” to public health. Pointing to reproductive damage, cardiac effects, and oxidative stress, which can accelerate “every chronic disease we suffer from,” Paul slammed the US government for passing laws to speed up the rollout of 5G technology, but refusing to fund research into the consequences.

    With 5G promising a new chapter in a debate that has raged for three decades, lawsuits like the one filed against Apple and Samsung will likely become more and more commonplace.

     

    © Pixnio

     

    https://quantsalus.com/faq/


    24.08.2019 | Fiddling while world burns: The unbearable pointlessness of G7




    As leaders of countries that control 40 percent of the world’s GDP gather at a French resort to discuss economic inequality and other issues they consider pressing, the rest of the world wonders if the G7 still has a purpose. Much has changed since the first meeting of six industrialized countries, back in 1975, convened to address the oil crisis and financial turmoil of the time. The Franco-German initiative brought on board the US, UK, Japan and Italy. Canada joined in 1976, and Russia in 1998 (only to be suspended in 2014).  The seven countries involved account for ten percent of the world’s population, but 40 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP). Not only is the wealth gap between the G7 and the rest of humanity vast, but the chasm between the rich and the poor in those countries is the greatest it has been in over half a century. Yet “inequality” is one of the top issues on the agenda of this year’s summit in Biarritz, France. Another important issue the G7 is supposed to discuss is “climate change.” Having industrialized and profited from it, the member countries are now demanding of the rest of the world to abandon technology for the sake of saving the planet – ignoring pesky things such as sovereignty or international law. “Our house is burning. Literally,” declared French President Emmanuel Macron, referring to the wildfires devastating the Amazon rainforests in Brazil, and asking for the G7 to “discuss this emergency.” One would think that the G7 would have extended an invitation to Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, to offer help and support in dealing with the wildfires. His name, however, is not among the summit guests. Leaders of Australia, India, Spain and Rwanda are. Rather than offering help to Brazil, Macron and Merkel are threatening to block the trade deal between the EU and Mercosur. On Friday, the French president accused Bolsonaro of “lying” about his position on climate change. So what exactly is the G7 proposing to do about the Amazon beyond signaling their virtuous commitment to rainforests,  invade? For that, they would need the backing of US President Donald Trump – who happens to like Bolsonaro personally, and isn’t too keen on the moralizing statements from European leaders, who threaten trade embargoes even as they condemn his tariff wars.  Washington traditionally does whatever it wants, without asking – or caring about – what the G7, or the rest of the world, have to say. The current US president just made it impossible to politely pretend otherwise. As for the summit in Biarritz, it’s all bark and no bite, an expensive exercise in the rich and the arrogant fiddling while the world around them burns.   Faces of the G7 leaders drawn on the sand by artist Sam Dougados in Biarritz, France on the eve of the G7 summit, August 23, 2019. ©  REUTERS/Regis Duvignau https://quantsalus.com/faq...

    As leaders of countries that control 40 percent of the world’s GDP gather at a French resort to discuss economic inequality and other issues they consider pressing, the rest of the world wonders if the G7 still has a purpose.

    Much has changed since the first meeting of six industrialized countries, back in 1975, convened to address the oil crisis and financial turmoil of the time. The Franco-German initiative brought on board the US, UK, Japan and Italy. Canada joined in 1976, and Russia in 1998 (only to be suspended in 2014).

     The seven countries involved account for ten percent of the world’s population, but 40 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP). Not only is the wealth gap between the G7 and the rest of humanity vast, but the chasm between the rich and the poor in those countries is the greatest it has been in over half a century. Yet “inequality” is one of the top issues on the agenda of this year’s summit in Biarritz, France.

    Another important issue the G7 is supposed to discuss is “climate change.” Having industrialized and profited from it, the member countries are now demanding of the rest of the world to abandon technology for the sake of saving the planet – ignoring pesky things such as sovereignty or international law.

    “Our house is burning. Literally,” declared French President Emmanuel Macron, referring to the wildfires devastating the Amazon rainforests in Brazil, and asking for the G7 to “discuss this emergency.”

    One would think that the G7 would have extended an invitation to Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, to offer help and support in dealing with the wildfires. His name, however, is not among the summit guests. Leaders of Australia, India, Spain and Rwanda are.

    Rather than offering help to Brazil, Macron and Merkel are threatening to block the trade deal between the EU and Mercosur. On Friday, the French president accused Bolsonaro of “lying” about his position on climate change. So what exactly is the G7 proposing to do about the Amazon beyond signaling their virtuous commitment to rainforests,  invade?

    For that, they would need the backing of US President Donald Trump – who happens to like Bolsonaro personally, and isn’t too keen on the moralizing statements from European leaders, who threaten trade embargoes even as they condemn his tariff wars. 

    Washington traditionally does whatever it wants, without asking – or caring about – what the G7, or the rest of the world, have to say. The current US president just made it impossible to politely pretend otherwise.

    As for the summit in Biarritz, it’s all bark and no bite, an expensive exercise in the rich and the arrogant fiddling while the world around them burns.

     


    20.08.2019 | Deeper underground: Alien-hunting Mars rover set to drill for signs of life




    The ESA’s new ‘Rosalind’ rover, tasked with seeking out signs of life on Mars, has been fitted with a drill that will delve deeper than any previous mission, to explore “pristine soil” not-yet damaged by radiation. The rover, named after pioneering British scientist Rosalind Franklin, is nearing completion at the Airbus Defense and Space factory in Britain. It will then be shipped to France for testing ahead of its launch in July 2020, with a scheduled landing on Mars the following spring. Previous expeditions on the red planet only managed to scrape the rough and barren surface. But scientists believe billions of years ago Mars resembled Earth, with flowing rivers and lakes. However, analysis of the surface shows significant radiation damage may be hiding the planet’s true potential, so samples must be taken from at least one meter below ground to test minerals that may hold signs of past life. Rosalind, which is part of the Roscosmos and European Space Agency ExoMars program, will land in what scientists believe was once an ocean which became covered over by lava from volcanic eruptions, meaning the site’s underlying material may have only been exposed to the elements relatively recently.  The rover has just been fitted with a state-of-the-art camera system, PanCam, that will control the rover’s scientific operations and decide where to drive and drill.   © ESA / ATG medialab   https://quantsalus.com/contacts...

    The ESA’s new ‘Rosalind’ rover, tasked with seeking out signs of life on Mars, has been fitted with a drill that will delve deeper than any previous mission, to explore “pristine soil” not-yet damaged by radiation.

    The rover, named after pioneering British scientist Rosalind Franklin, is nearing completion at the Airbus Defense and Space factory in Britain. It will then be shipped to France for testing ahead of its launch in July 2020, with a scheduled landing on Mars the following spring.

    Previous expeditions on the red planet only managed to scrape the rough and barren surface. But scientists believe billions of years ago Mars resembled Earth, with flowing rivers and lakes. However, analysis of the surface shows significant radiation damage may be hiding the planet’s true potential, so samples must be taken from at least one meter below ground to test minerals that may hold signs of past life.

    Rosalind, which is part of the Roscosmos and European Space Agency ExoMars program, will land in what scientists believe was once an ocean which became covered over by lava from volcanic eruptions, meaning the site’s underlying material may have only been exposed to the elements relatively recently. 

    The rover has just been fitted with a state-of-the-art camera system, PanCam, that will control the rover’s scientific operations and decide where to drive and drill.

     

    © ESA / ATG medialab

     

    https://quantsalus.com/contacts


    20.08.2019 | Mercedes caught ‘spying on drivers with secret tracking devices’




    Mercedes-Benz has found itself at the center of an apparently illegal spying operation, following reports that it installed tracking devices on thousands of vehicles and shared customer location data with third parties. According to the Sun, Mercedes-Benz fitted secret sensors to all new and used vehicles sold through its official dealers from as far back as 2018.  These sensors can pinpoint a vehicle’s location and the data is then transmitted to a central location. Both the driver and car information can then be passed to bailiffs who can then seize and repossess the vehicle from indebted drivers at will.  The company sold more than 170,000 new cars in Britain this year, roughly 80 percent of which are reportedly sold on finance plans. The sensors are separate and operate independently from both the anti-theft tracking devices and the optional extra ‘Mercedes Me’ service.  Mercedes has yet to officially confirm how long it has been engaged in the practice, but reportedly claims the trackers are only activated in “extreme circumstances” in which drivers have defaulted on payments and failed to contact the company in a timely fashion.  Tracking a vehicle without its driver's knowledge or consent is illegal under EU data protection laws. However, many customers apparently unwittingly give their permission by not thoroughly reading the lengthy terms and conditions. Mercedes claims that the clause about “location sensors” can be found right above where a customer signs their finance contract. Liberty (originally the National Council for Civil Liberties), an organization which fights mass surveillance and abuse of power, described the “creeping growth of surveillance in the private sector” as “particularly disturbing.”   File photo: © Mike / Pexels   https://quantsalus.com/news/...

    Mercedes-Benz has found itself at the center of an apparently illegal spying operation, following reports that it installed tracking devices on thousands of vehicles and shared customer location data with third parties.

    According to the Sun, Mercedes-Benz fitted secret sensors to all new and used vehicles sold through its official dealers from as far back as 2018. 

    These sensors can pinpoint a vehicle’s location and the data is then transmitted to a central location. Both the driver and car information can then be passed to bailiffs who can then seize and repossess the vehicle from indebted drivers at will. 

    The company sold more than 170,000 new cars in Britain this year, roughly 80 percent of which are reportedly sold on finance plans.

    The sensors are separate and operate independently from both the anti-theft tracking devices and the optional extra ‘Mercedes Me’ service. 

    Mercedes has yet to officially confirm how long it has been engaged in the practice, but reportedly claims the trackers are only activated in “extreme circumstances” in which drivers have defaulted on payments and failed to contact the company in a timely fashion. 

    Tracking a vehicle without its driver's knowledge or consent is illegal under EU data protection laws. However, many customers apparently unwittingly give their permission by not thoroughly reading the lengthy terms and conditions. Mercedes claims that the clause about “location sensors” can be found right above where a customer signs their finance contract.

    Liberty (originally the National Council for Civil Liberties), an organization which fights mass surveillance and abuse of power, described the “creeping growth of surveillance in the private sector” as “particularly disturbing.”

     

    File photo: © Mike / Pexels

     

    https://quantsalus.com/news/


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